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  1. #21
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    Obelysk

    You have to take the amino acids and magnesium together if you donít it most likely will not work. Your best bet is to take them first thing in the morning right out of bed on an empty stomach, wait about 30 minutes then eat.

    Please go back and read how I described to Captain Deep Breath to take them on page one of this post.

    You most likely will have some withdrawal symptoms when stopping the meds so you might feel worse before you start to feel better but itís possible you may not have any withdrawal symptoms at all. Stay well hydrated during this period and avoid caffeine, sugar and any type of juice thatís high in citric acid.

    Itís important to take amino acids and magnesium together.

    Let us know how you progress.

    Hanino

  2. #22
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    Thank you

    I want to thank you for posting your wonderful information about amino acids and magnesium. I have been taking them for 12 days. My physical ailments are gone I no longer have night anxiety pounding or racing heart when trying to fall asleep now I fall asleep very easy and sleep all the way through the night. The panic attacks I would have when driving are gone no more dizzy feeling or feeling like the cars are coming right at me what a relief. I am on my way back to being myself I will keep you informed. Thank you Erica.

  3. #23
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    Erica

    You're welcome, I'm glad you're feeling better. It's amazing how something so simple works so well eh? I found one of the best things about taking amino acids and magnesium besides not having anxiety anymore is that it does not disrupt your life by doctors appointments, group therapy or whatever the case maybe and without the side effects of prescription medications.

    I'm sure you will continue to get better, sounds like you're well on your way.

    Keep us posted.

    Hanino

  4. #24
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    Hi Hanino I wanted to let you know I am doing very well. I feel better now than before I started to have anxiety I have energy and just feel good. Every time I drive I am so grateful that I no longer have panic attacks. To answer your question yes itís very amazing. I bought more magnesium glutamine and amino fuel and I want to stay stocked up on it. How long do you think I will need to take them?

  5. #25
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    Hi Hanino and everyone else, just thought I would post a couple of things here about what helped me since it seems related. I had many years of panic attacks/anxiety and found out finally in Sep. of 2006 I was allergic to gluten. For those who don't know, gluten is a protein found in grains such as wheat, barley, rye, and sometimes oats. Gluten has been found to block the absorption of nutrients in the foods we eat, in particular with people who are sensitive. I haven't had an attack since going gluten-free and had no idea before I went on this diet that this had anything to do with it. I hope this helps someone else and I wish I had only known this earlier because that would've saved me a lot of suffering. Life's great now though and I don't mind this type of a diet at all...I can eat all kinds of foods and have special gluten-free pizzas, pastas, breads, cookies, etc. There's always new stuff that companies are coming out with that are gluten-free and delicious! I am so glad I no longer have to worry that I might have an attack because I feel now that it was just an allergy.

  6. #26
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    care_berry

    Thanks, I remember reading something about gluten and allergic reactions a few years back, I must have been in panic at the time because I didn't remember it till your post. Out standing post and great information one more bullet for the anxiety-fighting arsenal. I hope people read this and have the test.

    Thanks again.

    Hanino

  7. #27
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    I tried this today; Magnesium Ocide and Gluocate with B-1000 or something like that. Worked pretty well, relieved much brain fog and didn't feel that much fatigue as normal, about to head to bed thanks for the information Hanino, I'll keep you posted.

  8. #28
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    You're welcome

    Neeley

    You're welcome.

    That's good to hear, if you put the amino acids that I recommended into the mix you should feel even better.

    If you have any questions feel free to ask.

    Hanino

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Erica_X
    How long do you think I will need to take them?
    Erica

    Sorry I didn't reply to you sooner.

    I took them every day for 6 months always in the morning on an empty tummy, now I take them one to two times a week. I can't say how long you will have to take them but if you have to take them for a long time it's better than taking meds with out the side effects.

    Hanino

  10. #30
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    This is a very good article on Amino Acids!

    When you hear about anxiety, you also commonly hear about low levels of key neurotransmitters such as serotonin, norepinephrine, epinephrine, and dopamine. Because of our poor diets, sedentary lifestyles, exposure to contaminants such as heavy metals from environmental pollution, nutrient malabsorption, and chronic infections due to bacteria, fungi, and viruses, many people suffer from low neurotransmitter levels that affect the transmission of messages between nerve cells. This is sometimes referred to as neurotransmitter deficiency disorder.

    Because of the rising rates of anxiety, depression, and other psychological disorders, it is becoming more evident that neurotransmitter deficiency disorder is not only common, but may be epidemic in our modern society. The number of people who suffer from anxiety disorder, panic attacks, related depression, and mood disorders has increased in recent years.

    But how do we get neurotransmitters? Neurotransmitters are made from amino acids, the building blocks of protein. There are 20 amino acids, which are divided in two categories: 10 non-essential and 10 essential amino acids. Non-essential amino acids are produced by the body. Essential amino acids cannot be produced by the body, and must be obtained from the foods that we eat. There are 10 essential amino acids that are necessary for humans: tryptophan, lysine, methionine, phenylalanine, threonine, valine, leucine, and isoleucine, histidine, and arginine. Histidine and arginine are particularly beneficial for children and seniors. A poor diet lacking in essential amino acids means that the body cannot sufficiently produce key neurotransmitters.

    When you have a chronic condition, it is likely that your body is already deficient in amino acids due to an inadequate absorption of nutrients. Conditions such as leaky gut syndrome, candida, and bowel diseases such as irritable bowel syndrome or inflammatory bowel disease, can inhibit the bodyís absorption of amino acids, causing key neurotransmitters to be depleted.

    Interestingly, stimulants such as caffeine, ephedra (found in weight loss products), stimulant prescription medications such as Ritalinģ, and others, can dramatically reduce the effectiveness of neurotransmitters. Anxiety is often experienced after taking stimulants (such as drinking too much coffee or soda) in part due to the reduced effectiveness of neurotransmitters.

    Prescription medications for anxiety (such as Paxilģ, Effexorģ, Zoloftģ, Wellbutrinģ, and a multitude of others) serve to reduce the symptoms of anxiety, but donít fix the problem. When your body is low in serotonin, these medications work by tricking the body to metabolize serotonin. They work on serotonin metabolism, but they donít replenish serotonin, which is actually what your body truly needs. Therefore, patients who suffer from low serotonin levels often experience withdrawal symptoms when they go off prescription medications, because serotonin is never being replenished. If you stop these medications, you will most likely return to low serotonin levels and continue to experience the same problems of anxiety and depression. In addition, these medications actually deplete serotonin with long-term use, which is exactly the opposite of what you need to do!

    In addition, prescription medications that work on isolated parts of the brain can produce potentially severe side effects in other areas of the body. Many people find that they simply canít take prescription psychotropic medications due to severe side effects. These include metabolic disorders such as hypoglycemia, insulin resistance, and diabetes; weight gain and obesity; drug-induced insomnia, mania, agitation, or depression; psychosis; suicidal and/or homicidal ideation; and a multitude of other digestive symptoms such as severe constipation. Essentially, in many cases you trade anxiety for another equally troubling symptom. It is now becoming clear that children who take certain psychotropic medications such as Paxil may increase their risk for suicidal ideation.1

    Amino acid therapy, on the other hand, has virtually no reported side effects to date. There have been no reported cases of overdose from amino acids either.

    Note: Speak to your healthcare professional about amino acid supplementation before combining it with prescription psychotropic medications, or before stopping any medication, since sudden discontinuation may produce severe withdrawal.

    If youíre deficient in amino acids, how do you replenish them? Essential amino acids are found in your diet in the form of protein, such as red meat, fowl (turkey, chicken), wild-caught fish, nuts and seeds, eggs, and milk. Oftentimes, a lack of dietary protein causes amino acid deficiency, so itís always important to eat protein at every meal in a healthy ratio of 40% carbohydrates, 30% protein, and 30% healthy fat (Read more about good fats and bad fats). During each meal, you should try to come close to satisfying this ratio. In fact, eating protein during every meal can reduce the symptoms of anxiety, especially if you eat proteins (such as turkey and milk) that are high in tryptophan, the precursor to serotonin. Eating a small protein snack, instead of a sugary refined snack, can immediately help relieve anxiety attacks (panic attacks), because amino acids are being replenished by the intake of protein.

    If you are a vegan or vegetarian, you are more susceptible to amino acid deficiency because protein in plant sources doesnít contain all the amino acids that your body needs. Supplementing your diet with high-quality amino acids is essential to ensure that your neurotransmitter levels are replenished. Additionally, those who suffer from chronic conditions should consider supplementing their diets with high-quality amino acids, to ensure adequate amino acid levels during times of illness, particularly when amino acid deficiency is likely.
    Source: http://www.jigsawhealth.com/resource...o-acid-therapy

    *edit: added quote box and source link

 

 

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