Welcome to the Anxiety Forum - A Home for Those with Anxiety, Fear, or Panic Attacks.
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  1. #11
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    I agree with the idea of walking, but do it in neighborhoods you feel safe in, as opposed to neighborhoods you aren't familiar with or may have a lot of dogs who are supposed to be on a leash but aren't.

  2. #12
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    This is such a great and important topic!

    When I was knee deep in severe panic disorder, I had a gym membership. The gym had an entire floor devoted to yoga with really good teachers, even one yoga teacher imported from India. I lived literally, less than a 5 minute walk door to door to this gym. I had that same issue, where any amount of heart elevating would freak me out but I decided to at least do the yoga. Well, I went 3-4 days a week and not once, had a panic attack during the class. Although, I did go fully stoned from 2 mg. of Klonopins once which I do not recommend! That was weird!

    So anyway, what I found, was yoga killed so many birds with one stone. It incorporated muscle building and cardio, got me out of the house, and I was part of a community where you'd see the same teachers and other members regularly. Before and after class people would socialize too. The nice cute yoga girl butts bending over in front of me was no small bonus as well, I got to admit!

    And of course, the entire experience is such a healing and positive environment, and everyone is super stoked and enthusiastic about yoga! Perfect environment for anxiety sufferers.

    Now, in my life I do many other types of exercise as well, and now I try and get my heart to beat really fast during workouts, which is a funny twist of irony. But when knee deep in anxiety, in any case, finding a yoga class nearby that you can regularly go to, can be really beneficial when suffering from anxiety.

    You do not have to be good, in shape or skinny, just do the best you can. The goal of yoga is to push yourself from where you are, and feel it internally, even if you can only bend 1 inch.

    I highly recommend it!

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by PR83 View Post
    Hello all,

    I have wanted to get back in shape for years and exercise helps my anxiety. The problem is that I go into a panic mode whenever I exercise, subconsciously. My body tenses (more than it should) and my breathing becomes erratic (which leads to pins and needles, and more body tension). I try to do cardio sessions at home (from youtube videos) and can barely get through 5 minutes because everything is tight and I feel like I am running through cement! Any help with this appreciated! Maybe I just need to have some "self talk" and let myself know I will be okay before working out?
    Exercise is so effective for mood disorders that many people like myself use it as our primary source of medicine. It's also great as a means within an existing medication regime! In fact fact the lack of physical activity and the adoption of sedentary lifestyles is largely responsible for many physical and mental disorders. Keeping physically active is the best preventative measure when it comes to my mental instability.

    As someone on a disability pension for mental illness using exercise and alternative lifestyle choices as his medication; I'll give you two word that are key! Desire & Consistency!!!

    Desire enables and sets my genuine intention which is more important than how hard or little I start out. Starting out too little has the potential to allow my usual complacent mindset + my all to often clinically induced procrastination end a well meaning exercise regime before it even has a chance to become established. Desire is a process like anything else and takes time to cultivate. Knowledge in the area of forming long lasting habits and fostering motivation are but a "few" key components to the psychological approach. The Art of Starting is something I have attained due to many failed attempts in whatever, however the KEY to becoming a master of balance is determination that leads to consistency!

    The level of intensity when beginning a new regime and throughout is appropriately managed with Desire and Consistency but more so with knowledge. Desire and Consistency come to together as the mind tunes in with the body. This process is quite invigorating and brings about its own reward before you even see results in the mirror. Knowledge opens doors by allowing more options under which to keep active without going batty. It also helps us overall with rest and recovery which is probably the most misunderstood element within one's exercise routine. Start out to hard and you will bust, start out too little and you will fizzle.
    ____________________________________________

    I've only just scratched the surface with the key element to making change that's seriously going to last. It's actually time for me to start a new journal which is just yet another strategy to my approach with keeping in routine, on track and balanced. I hope some of what I said makes a little sense. I tend to get off balance if I am do not keep moving!!! It's all about the way we "cycle" - the level intensity, duration, rest and recovery. The resulting peace of mind and the ability to handle my fear in a fucked up world is my ultimate reward!

    All the best - imo - WALKING is by far the best way to start out but keeping desire and consistency in mind. From there it only gets better and if you ever need to fall back - do so with walking, desire and consistency. The pattern in that will see determination develop within and you will also become a master of the psychological approach. It only gets better from there - regardless of whatever.

    Wishing you all the best.
    Last edited by Ponder; 03-29-2017 at 04:18 PM.

  4. #14
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    Maybe also light weight training and work your way up.

  5. #15
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    Walking daily, in the sunshine if you can, should go without saying how important it is for this situation. Walking to a yoga class and back. There you go! 2 for 1.

  6. #16
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    Nov 2015
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    Podunk Earth
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    A companion might help. I exercise by hiking in the woods with my dog. She's a great motivator, we do almost a mile of steep hills every day. The woods are also very realxing compared to a gym.

  7. #17
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    Aug 2016
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    Do you guys sometimes become too depressed to go out and walk or to a gym?

  8. #18
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    Maryland (MD)
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    I walk a lot in my office building. My office is on the 2nd floor and the bathroom is down 2 flights of steps and I go a number of times a day, so that is how I get my walking in. When I am busy and my mind is occupied, it is harder for me to feel depressed.

  9. #19
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    Springfield
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carnelian View Post
    Do you guys sometimes become too depressed to go out and walk or to a gym?
    Sometimes. I have a normal exercise routine, which involves running and walking long distances. Then I have a secondary routine, which involves a few minutes of stretching and a quick jog up and down some stairs.

    If I'm hurried or am feeling low, I do the secondary routine for 5-10 mins, just to keep in that habit of exercising.

  10. #20
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    May 2014
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carnelian View Post
    Do you guys sometimes become too depressed to go out and walk or to a gym?
    Absolutely. I haven't found a way around this aside from "count down from 10 and just do it", and then I'm overwhelmed by the stress of doing it when I adamantly don't want to. I'm assuming/hoping it will get a little better over time

 

 

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