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  1. #21
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    Whether anyone likes it or not, medical intervention is necessary in certain circumstances such as heart attack,
    stroke, cancer, severe bleeding and the like. Without medical intervention you would be six feet under and that
    is all she wrote.

  2. #22
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    Of course it is necessary, docs saved my life a quiet few times. If this was not for health care I would be dead 40 years ago. NDE is not easy to take............ docs are necessary so is medication which save lifes.
    We just try to do other things first before popping the pill, at least I do.
    I am on meds for HBG, HBP, and on clonazepam, so not I need it, I take it.
    It is about OP and her success (I do believe she just started to do first steps in this direction) in going back to normal, happy life.
    Kirk I do agree, but I would be cremated not smelling the daisies
    ''“If you cry because the sun has gone out of your life, your tears will prevent you from seeing the stars.”
    ''
    ― Rabindranath Tagore

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kirk View Post
    Whether anyone likes it or not, medical intervention is necessary in certain circumstances such as . Without medical intervention you would be six feet under and that
    is all she wrote.
    We have house calls in this country for fee to stop filling up the emergency entrances from otherwise trivial cases. They even have adverts on prime time TV to educate people on such a dilemma.

    People can avoid "heart attack "... stroke, cancer, severe bleeding and the like ... by avoiding the very consumer products that cause these kinds of ailments to begin with. So in fact, if you don't like medical intervention then it would be best to avoid the circumstances that go a long way to making medical intervention "necessary."


    Then of course many people are at a loss and choose to consume the way they do - in order to kill themselves, which makes the term "necessity" a rather subjective point of view. This be the state of affairs we currently live in. Either way ... this cycle is great for the business of medical intervention whilst upholding so called moral ethics and instilling a false sense of purpose in those who thrive on them.
    Last edited by Ponder; 11-03-2016 at 10:37 PM.

  4. #24
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    You are correct in SOME cases, but not ALL. Here in Baltimore, their is a radio show where a natural pharmacist talks about exercise,
    eating healthy organic foods, staying away from processed foods, taking supplements, etc. He owns a large holistic pharmacy, yoga studio, etc.
    He said that in his estimation no matter what he does, he cannot rid himself of all cancer risk. Many illnesses are also the result of heredity, bad luck, etc.
    So to say all diseases can be avoided, is not realistic.

  5. #25
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    Thx for the clarification. I'll accept what you have said. What matters is acknowledging what is within our control and working with that. It matters not what others have to say except that which we know to be true for ourselves. For sure a lot can be gained gleaning from others, but nothing beats learning from our own personal experience. One of my main points I was trying to make, is that once we have been sick long enough, we either make the decision to heal ourselves or we just give in and continue to pop the pills. I can't speak for others - but I do know one scenario is about taking responsibility for self, whilst the other tends to leave it in the hands of others. Of course it's not an open and shut case or rings as clear as a bell or quite as simple as that.

    I would swap out SOME for MOST when it comes to the amount of SAD cases that plague this world. In that light I would also say ... that's being real. It's not pleasant, and it's understandable that people choose not to accept it or any form of pain. It is how we have been and are conditioned. I'd say that holistic fella knows very well that only through acceptance comes relief as opposed to hiding from unpleasant experiences. Only then can true healing take place - no matter how far gone or infested we or any other person be. Coming to know and experience such is what gives me hope and why I continue to breathe. The knowing/discovery in that, brings about a real sense of peace no matter how senseless things can seem.
    Last edited by Ponder; 11-04-2016 at 05:39 AM.

  6. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by Ponder View Post
    We have house calls in this country for fee to stop filling up the emergency entrances from otherwise trivial cases. They even have adverts on prime time TV to educate people on such a dilemma.
    That makes a lot of sense. I vaguely remember hearing about nearby paramedics trained to make house calls rather than transporting patients to the hospital, when it's something they're equipped to handle. It'd be great to see emergency rooms handling actual emergencies.

    Kirk, I appreciate your response about the concierge, whether I can afford it or not. It was nice to know expected costs, in case I ever did want to go that route.

    I can't swallow pills, so medication for anxiety hasn't really been a serious option, though I've been desperate enough to consider it if they had been on hand. My main interest in having a home visit is for testing, to see what physical things could possibly be out of whack. I get that the agoraphobia stems from my fear of the panic attacks, but the initial ones came out of nowhere or even during my sleep, which I equate to a physical imbalance. It would just be nice to know a starting point instead of trial and error with supplements and such, hoping I land on the right combination.

    Driving is a big phobia at the moment. I've worked up to driving to my neighbor's house, but once my home is out of sight, it's all over. Being a passenger is no better, especially since I'm easily car sick. The biggest help has been the puppy I got a few weeks ago. With his help, I walk to the mailbox and get some exercise. He's still scared of a lot, so I try to be strong for him. I'm finally ready to see and socialize with people, which is awesome.

  7. #27
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    Now that sounds like a step in the right direction. Take your time, and pay no mind to the setbacks when they happen. Sensible planning without too much expectation often helps me to see myself slowly making gains with graduated exposure. Having a well thought out escape (a well planed path of retreat without the need for drama) also helps. The more I prepped early on before leaving my door, the less dramatic things felt before I left. Little bit by little bit.

    Perhaps there may be something of help among the following Link:
    Planning Ahead for Agoraphobia/Social Phobia

 

 

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